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On the Road to the Supreme Court: Anti-Gay Billboard Suit

From 365gay.com

A conservative pastor who is battling Staten Island for ordering the removal of a billboard containing a Biblical condemnation of homosexuality says he is prepared to take the fight all the way to the US Supreme Court.

A three judge federal appeals panel is hearing his appeal of a ruling last November dismissing his case.

The Rev. Kristopher Okwedy says the billboard message is protected under his constitutional right to practice his religion. He is being represented by a lawyer furnished by the American Family Association.

Attorney Stephen Crampton said the case highlights the conflict between gay rights and the right of Christians to publicly quote Bible passages that declare homosexuality a sin.

In 2003 New York billboard company PNE removed the sign bought by Okwedy after Staten Island Borough President Guy Molinari wrote a letter of protest to the company.

Okwedy paid PNE Media about $2,500 to design billboard signs that quoted a passage from Leviticus: "Thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind. It is abomination."

Crampton couldn't be more right. How far can conservative Christians go? When do their rights to free speech and religious expression begin to infringe on another person's rights?

Posted by Ace

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By Anonymous Anonymous, at 8/17/06 12:47 PM

I can understand the need for anti-discrimination and all. But your comment took me a little by surprise.

"When do thier rights to free speech and religious expression begin to infringe on another person's rights?"

The debate on rights infringement is huge and has many issues and subjects. I would turn the question around.

"When do gay rights infringe on religious rights and the rights of an individual's free speech?"


With so many minorities and groups vieing for more rights and special treatment, I have to wonder if they really want equality or superiority?    



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